Two wins in their last 11 games – it is amazing that Leeds United still cling to second in the Championship – a tenuous grip of just goal difference.

That is a long way from when they rode roughshod over many sides in stretching out a gap between themselves and the play-off pack that once looked likely to be stretchable to 13 points. Those days are gone and the Whites are now looking to build beyond their current bad form and look towards reestablishing a solid base over the next few games.

The first step out of their mire of bad form came with Tuesday night’s somewhat unexpected draw against Brentford in a game many expected Leeds to lose handsomely. It was a performance that Whites fans could take a lot of heart from. Here are three things that they learned from their sides display at Griffin Park.

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Three things learned from Leeds United draw at Brentford

1. Kalvin Phillips is integral to Leeds United system: Three games without him and one game with him was enough to prove one thing – Leeds United rely on KP. He was out whilst the Leeds slump continued but his game at Brentford was one reason why United were successful. He helped to break up the dangers posed by the Bees BMW attack. His crossfield long-ball passing was superb. It was the return of the Yorkshire Pirlo, you know.

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2. Leeds make teams play their way: Forget about managers saying that Leeds have been sussed out, the simple fact of the matter is that Leeds United often force sides to play the game their way. Against Brentford they aggressively man-marked Thomas Frank’s outfit causing them to rely on the long-ball approach for much of the game. That approach helped to contribute to the successes Leeds had on the night.

3. The jury will remain out on Kiko Casilla: Casilla’s long-awaited FA hearing on charges of racism are due to be heard next week. Well, that’s the common consensus amongst journalists and pundits who are in the know. However, after a calamitous run of games where the Spaniard has been either easily beaten or committed howlers, fans might be forgiven in hoping that the FA find him guilty.

About Author

My usually loud cynicism has turned to quiet optimism with the arrival of Marcelo Bielsa at Leeds United. I'm a father to three loud children; two fully-grown and one eight-year-old who thinks he is. My main job is in teaching but I find it cathartic to write about football when the opportunity arises. I mostly write about Leeds United but turn my hand to other clubs.